Look me in the eyes. Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's by John Elder Robison

Look Me in the Eye

look me in the eyes

I was also rubbed the wrong way by the tone of the book. Much of his writing was interesting. But to be fair, Aspergians can definitely be that way, so it was truth in style, more or less. That understanding transformed the way Robison saw himself—and the world. I've read quite a bit of Augusten Burroughs -- for the most part when his various books first came out -- so although I have a pretty good mental picture of the neglect and chaos that surrounded his childhood, I really couldn't remember that he even had an older brother. It would be easier, certainly, if it were just that the connections were unwanted.

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Look me in the eye

look me in the eyes

As John matured, he learned that his natural tendency to blurt out the first thing that came to his mind was not socially acceptable. But I decided that I would try not to hold Robison's family against him and read his book. I worked exclusivly with an adolescent with Asperger's for about six months and it was an exhausting experience. Her story is told in a more down-to-earth and understandable way, and she's more likable. The author Robison had it undiagnosed for most of his life. When shaking hands with someone, you should always look them in the eyes. I highly recommend this book.

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Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's by John Elder Robison

look me in the eyes

On the one hand I suppose I'm glad that it helps dissolve the notion that people with Asperger's now grouped in under autism in general are not idiots or freaks, but just people with a different way of thinking. Hmm, it's hard to write this review because I don't want to sound mean-spirited at any point. For the first hand insight that this book gives into Asperger's, this is a valuable resource. He wanted to be normal and he understood the obstacles that stood before him. When I hold you in my arms I know that it's forever I just gotta let you know I never wanna let you go Cause when you look me in the eyes. This type of inborn genius is a characteristic of a savant. This has always bothered me.

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Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger's by John Elder Robison

look me in the eyes

I am interested in the Asperger's continuum, so when I heard about this memoir - written by Augusten Burroughs's brother - I added it to my Amazon wish list. The second, that my own little Superman has been diagnosed with autism and I wanted to learn more from the humanistic standpoint. . All this has him looked upon as weirdo. Everything's alright, When you're right here by my side.

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Look me in the eye

look me in the eyes

Robison was able to do something his brother failed to do in Running With Scissors, conclude the story. Because I was a very mischievous child myself, I found this story really interesting and couldn't help feeling sorry for this boy as a child and how lonely he must have been. He corrects this way of thinking. But not all is doom and gloom. Later in life, John recognized that he had some characteristics that were savant-like.

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Look Me in the Eye

look me in the eyes

I was quickly horrified to learn that the author is the real-life brother of Augusten Burroughs, author of Running with Scissors. I designed sound systems for more bands than I could count. In a day when a cure is expected for nearly every ailment, flaw or disorder, I was struck by John Elder Robinson's assertion that those with Asperger's Syndrome, a neurobiological disorder on the autism spectrum that the author lived with undiagnosed until he was forty, needs no cure - only understanding. He also showed streaks of violence that stemmed from the frustration he was feeling because he knew he didn't fit in but couldn't figure out exactly why that was the case. He also tells how he had to leave his little brother with their two nutty parents, though that boy grew up to also be an author and wrote 'Writing with Scissors', which I'm dying to read. Undeterred, but confused, he decided to try again, this time with a stick. The paperback is a revised version that he pruposefully cleaned up the language for because he knew there might be younger people reading his book.

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